26 November, 2022

Community leaders demand construction of schools after 107 years of waiting

They arrived at the offices of Mauricio Pineda, acting minister of education, where they heard the possibility of starting with the accreditation of land, that the affected people themselves have donated, and open the possibility of building schools.

By Maria T. Morales

The Savior – Regardless of the inclement weather, distance, much less the long dark road they had to cross, dozens of families fight to get the government of the day to turn its gaze towards the mountains of Chalatenango, where three communities have not had a school for more than 100 years.

Children who walk up to six hours to get to school, mothers and fathers who believe in education as the path to overcoming, arrived in the Salvadoran capital to express, to the authorities, their concern that children have no choice but to attend until the second grade.

Organized Faith Communities in Action (COFOA) in front of MINEDUCYT offices

More of 100 leaders left their communities at dawn, in the middle of an extreme storm, without a piece of bread, without a coffee and without money in his pockets, to peacefully protest the government's lack of response to the stalled request for school construction.

The storms, the dark of the rough road, hunger and thirst, They are part of the risks that long ago became silent witnesses of a tireless struggle by the inhabitants of the El Trigalito communities., in Sweet Name of Mary; Peter Diaz, in San Francisco Morazán and El Plan del Rancho in Citalá.

They arrived at the offices of Mauricio Pineda, acting minister of education, where they heard the possibility of starting with the accreditation of land, that the affected people themselves have donated, and open the possibility of building schools.

Those who today fight for their children, they already went through the lack of a school, so they came before the minister to express the reality of the 150 minors who await answers from the government.

Lucy Hernandez, of the Plan del Rancho community, he said "they're going 107 years of not having school. It is a necessity in our village”.

Hernández and dozens of leaders represented by the Communities of Faith Organized in Action (COFOA) expressed the urgent need for the construction of schools. “How much longer do we have to wait to have our school?” they wondered.

Organized Faith Communities in Action (COFOA) in front of MINEDUCYT offices